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Getting home

Getting home is a huge step on the road to recovery. While it is often an enormous relief to be back home, some may find the first few weeks a bit of an emotional rollercoaster in terms of readjusting to everyday life. In this section, we've provided some general information and advice on the common physical and psychological issues you might face,what you can do to help the recovery process along, and the types of help that might be available to you and your family after you get home.We've also included a few short pieces on other people's experience, which we hope you will find helpful.

 

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Article: "You have to stay positive"

When we've spoken to other people about their illness or recovery, they very often tell us that "staying positive" (although sometimes difficult) was very important to them. It is often surprising to hear this from people who have had the most difficult time of it, but time and time again, they tell us how "lucky" they feel and how helpful it is to "count your blessings". Here are some examples of the things people told us. It may take some time...

Article: "You've got to be determined"

Patients very often tell us how important their own "determination" is during the recovery process, particularly after they get home. While some people may always have had a determined personality, others told us that they had no choice but to be determined. "You've got to have the will...and say, "Yes, I am going to get better. I'm going to try and get my life back." It's important to stay focused on moving forward in your recovery, but...

Web Link: Age Scotland (advice for carers)

This link will take you to the Age Scotland website.They provide a fantastic range of information and advice on many different issues such as housing, legal issues, saving money on your energy bills, eating well and common health conditions. Much of this is available in free leaflets that you can download or print off. Part of their services include an Information and Advice team. Their staff and volunteers specialise in answering enquiries from older people, their carers and...

Web Link: Ageing well activities (Edinburgh Leisure)

This link takes you to the webpage of Edinburgh Leisure and their section on Ageing Well and Active Lives. They offer a fantastic range of activities for people over 50, including allotment gardening, buddy swimming, chair based exercises, dancing, photography, indoor curling, singing and walking.Why not give it a go?

Web Link: Alcohol and recovery: where to get help

Alcohol is a major health issue in Scotland.Research has shown that around a quarter of admissions to Intensive Care are alcohol related.If you're worried about how much you or someone you care about is drinking,there is plenty of help available. This link will take you to the Alcoholics Anonymous website.They hold groups all over Scotland and have a number of useful resources on their website, including other peoples' stories and easy to read literature that you can download...

Web Link: Alcohol and recovery: where to get help

Alcohol is a major health issue in Scotland. Research has shown that around a quarter of admissions to Intensive Care are alcohol-related.If you're worried about how much you, or a person you care about drinks, there is plenty of help available. This link will take you to the website of Scottish Families Affected by Alcohol. They offer information, advice, a helpline and local support groups for individuals and their family members.

Web Link: Asking for equipment after you get home

You may find, after you get home, that you need some simple equipment to make everyday life a bit easier. That might include equipment to make it easier to wash, dress, use the bathroom and move around. This link takes you to Edinburgh City Council's web page. Some of the equipment they offer is free of charge and can be installed for you. You can use this web page to see what types of equipment are available and you can ask for it using their online form (although you will have...

Web Link: Attendance Allowance

Attendance Allowance is a benefit for people aged 65 or over who need help with personal care (washing,dressing or eating, for example).Some patients need this type of help in the first few weeks and months after they get home.This link will take you to the NHS Choices web page, which will tell you more about what this allowance is, who is eligible and how to claim it.

Document: Balance exercises (NHS Choices)

This is a document from NHS Choices. It gives advice on some simple exercises to help with balance.You might want to speak to your GP or Physiotherapist before trying them.

Article: Balance issues

Patients sometimes tell us that they continue to have issues with balance after they go home. This can be due to a number of things including muscle wasting and weakness and numbness or tingling in the feet or legs. Some patients also suffer from a temporary loss of confidence when they first get home, although this seems to pass quite quickly in most cases.