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Getting home

Getting home is a huge step on the road to recovery. While it is often an enormous relief to be back home, some may find the first few weeks a bit of an emotional rollercoaster in terms of readjusting to everyday life. In this section, we've provided some general information and advice on the common physical and psychological issues you might face,what you can do to help the recovery process along, and the types of help that might be available to you and your family after you get home.We've also included a few short pieces on other people's experience, which we hope you will find helpful.

 

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Web Link: Driving

This link will take you to the web page of NHS Lothian's Driving Assessment Service. They offer an assessment service for people who want to start, resume or continue driving after an illness or injury. They are based at Astley Ainslie Hospital in Edinburgh, but can offer assessments in Dundee, Aberdeen, Inverness, Paisley, Irvine and Dumfries. Contact details are provided.

Web Link: East Lothian Community Physiotherapy Services

This link will take you to the webpage of the East Lothian community physiotherapy services. This physiotherapy service is available to those people living within East Lothian. This pahe will tell you about the type of physiotherapy available and how to access it.

Web Link: Edinburgh Crisis Centre

This link will take you to the Edinburgh Crisis Centre. They provide support to those caring for people with mental health issues in Lothian.They offer a freephone helpline, face to face support and the opportunity to stay at their Centre for up to 7 nights. Their freephone number is 0808 801 0414 You can also text them on 0797 442 9075

Web Link: Edinburgh Leisure

This link will take you to the website of Edinburgh Leisure.They have some really useful physical activity and health programmes.

Article: Equipment

Some equipment is considered essential for hospital discharge, which means that it MUST be in place before you go home.Other "non essential" items of equipment or home adaptations might be organised before you leave hospital, but may take some time to arrive. This might include things like shower seats, bath aids or grab rails.

Web Link: Equipment (for private purchase)

This link will take you to the Argos website.They have a section on mobility aids and aids for everyday living e.g. wheelchairs and walking aids, shower seats, grab rails, tables and trolleys, raised toilet seats, etc.

External Video: Exercises and Physiotherapy to help recovery

In this clip physiotherapist, Dr Bronwen Connolly explains how critical illness affects joints and muscles to cause joint stiffness and fatigue and how you can practice certain types of exercises to help you recover.

Document: Exercises for buiding strength

This is a booklet from NHS Choices. It gives examples of exercises to help build strength.You might want to speak to your doctor before trying them.

Document: Exercises for flexibility (NHS Choices)

This is a document from NHS Choices.It gives advice on simple exercises to improve flexibility.You might want to speak to your GP or Physiotherapist before trying them.

Web Link: Exercises for muscles and joints

May patients suffer from muscle wasting, muscle weakness or stiff and painful joints after Intensive Care.This link will take you to the NHS Inform website and their pages on muscle and joint issues, which you might find helpful. You can print off their advice and there is also an "app" that you can download onto your phone.