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Getting home

Getting home is a huge step on the road to recovery. While it is often an enormous relief to be back home, some may find the first few weeks a bit of an emotional rollercoaster in terms of readjusting to everyday life. In this section, we've provided some general information and advice on the common physical and psychological issues you might face,what you can do to help the recovery process along, and the types of help that might be available to you and your family after you get home.We've also included a few short pieces on other people's experience, which we hope you will find helpful.

 

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Web Link: Equipment (for private purchase)

This link will take you to the Argos website.They have a section on mobility aids and aids for everyday living e.g. wheelchairs and walking aids, shower seats, grab rails, tables and trolleys, raised toilet seats, etc.

External Video: Exercises and Physiotherapy to help recovery

In this clip physiotherapist, Dr Bronwen Connolly explains how critical illness affects joints and muscles to cause joint stiffness and fatigue and how you can practice certain types of exercises to help you recover.

Document: Exercises for buiding strength

This is a booklet from NHS Choices. It gives examples of exercises to help build strength.You might want to speak to your doctor before trying them.

Document: Exercises for flexibility (NHS Choices)

This is a document from NHS Choices.It gives advice on simple exercises to improve flexibility.You might want to speak to your GP or Physiotherapist before trying them.

Web Link: Exercises for muscles and joints

May patients suffer from muscle wasting, muscle weakness or stiff and painful joints after Intensive Care.This link will take you to the NHS Inform website and their pages on muscle and joint issues, which you might find helpful. You can print off their advice and there is also an "app" that you can download onto your phone.

Document: Exercises while sitting

This is a document from NHS Choices.It gives advice on simple exercises you can do while sitting in a chair.You might want to speak to a doctor or physiotherapist before trying them.

Article: Eye problems after Intensive Care

Some people develop problems with their eyes after Intensive Care.This commonly includes conditions called corneal abrasion (a painful scratch on the surface of the clear part of the eye) and keratitis (inflammation of the clear part of the eye).Symptoms include sore, dry or gritty eyes which can last for a few weeks after Intensive Care. If your symptoms are particularly troublesome or don't seem to be getting better, speak to your doctor, GP or optician.

Article: Feeling anxious

Is it common to feel anxious after Intensive Care? It's very common (and completely understandable) to feel anxious or uptight after Intensive Care. Research suggests that up to 4 in 10 Intensive Care patients suffer from anxiety at some point. Why am I so anxious? Some patients remember little of their time in Intensive Care, or their memories might be "jumbled" in amongst some strange but very real and vivid dreams, such that it's difficult to make...

Article: Feeling low

Is it common to feel low or depressed after Intensive Care? It's very common and completely understandable to feel low or depressed after being in Intensive Care. Research suggests that up to a third of Intensive Care patients suffer from depression at some point. Why do I feel so low? If you've suffered from depression in the past, it's more likely that you may do so again, but this is not always the case.There are a great many reasons why you might feel...

Web Link: Financial help

This link will take you to the Turn2Us website. They're a national charity who help people in financial hardship to gain access to benefits, charitable grants and support services, including the bereaved.