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Getting home

Getting home is a huge step on the road to recovery. While it is often an enormous relief to be back home, some may find the first few weeks a bit of an emotional rollercoaster in terms of readjusting to everyday life. In this section, we've provided some general information and advice on the common physical and psychological issues you might face,what you can do to help the recovery process along, and the types of help that might be available to you and your family after you get home.We've also included a few short pieces on other people's experience, which we hope you will find helpful.

 

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Document: Exercises while sitting

This is a document from NHS Choices.It gives advice on simple exercises you can do while sitting in a chair.You might want to speak to a doctor or physiotherapist before trying them.

Article: Eye problems after Intensive Care

Some people develop problems with their eyes after Intensive Care.This commonly includes conditions called corneal abrasion (a painful scratch on the surface of the clear part of the eye) and keratitis (inflammation of the clear part of the eye).Symptoms include sore, dry or gritty eyes which can last for a few weeks after Intensive Care. If your symptoms are particularly troublesome or don't seem to be getting better, speak to your doctor, GP or optician.

Article: Feeling anxious

Is it common to feel anxious after Intensive Care? It's very common (and completely understandable) to feel anxious or uptight after Intensive Care. Research suggests that up to 4 in 10 Intensive Care patients suffer from anxiety at some point. Why am I so anxious? Some patients remember little of their time in Intensive Care, or their memories might be "jumbled" in amongst some strange but very real and vivid dreams, such that it's difficult to make...

Article: Feeling low

Is it common to feel low or depressed after Intensive Care? It's very common and completely understandable to feel low or depressed after being in Intensive Care. Research suggests that up to a third of Intensive Care patients suffer from depression at some point. Why do I feel so low? If you've suffered from depression in the past, it's more likely that you may do so again, but this is not always the case.There are a great many reasons why you might feel...

Web Link: Financial help

This link will take you to the Turn2Us website. They're a national charity who help people in financial hardship to gain access to benefits, charitable grants and support services, including the bereaved.

Article: Flashbacks

What are flashbacks? Flashbacks are vivid and frightening memories.They can be intrusive, which means that they pop into your mind completely out of nowhere (or are sometimes brought about by something that reminds you of a particular event, even if it was really a dream or hallucination) and can make you feel like you're reliving a particular experience. You may feel like you have little or no control over them. Is it common to have flashbacks? Patients often...

Web Link: Free prescriptions and sight tests (over 60s)

This link takes you to DirectScot's website and their page on free prescriptions and eye tests. This page gives advice on who is eligible for free medicines, eye tests and other health care costs.

Article: General weakness

Is it normal to feel so weak? Yes. It is very common to feel weak and washed out in the first few weeks and months after getting home, even if you were previously fit and well. From what other people have told us, it seems that the legs are most severely affected by weakness, but you may also notice weakness in your arms, hands and shoulders. Going home usually means that you will be starting to do more for yourself than you did in hospital, and this may leave you feeling...

Web Link: Getting out and about for wheelchair users: Euan's guide

This link will take you to a website called Euan's Guide. It was originally developed by, with and for disabled people (particularly wheelchair users). Euan's guide is a site where patients and their families can find a list of wheelchair accessible places and add honest reviews about their experiences of visting them.Even if you're only using a wheelchair temporarily, it's good to hear about local bars, shops, hotels, coffee bars, visitor attractions, etc that have...

Web Link: Going back to work

This link will take you to the website of Healthy Working Lives. This page will give you information and advice on getting back to work after an illness or injury.