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The hospital wards

Being transferred to the hospital ward can be a real mixed bag of emotions for patients and families. While ward transfer is a sign of improvement and a step closer to going home, patients and families have to adjust to less monitoring and having fewer staff at close hand. 

Some patients "come to" on the wards, and have to begin to try to make sense of what has happened to them. Common psychological issues include strange dreams, problems sleeping or feeling anxious or low. Patients also become more aware of physical issues such as general weakness, tiredness, mobility problems, etc as they begin to do more for themselves.

In this section, we've provided some general information and advice on common physical and psychological issues issues during the ward stage of recovery, the types of staff involved in your care (who they are and what they do) and what to expect in terms of getting you home. We've also included sections on other people's experiences and frequently asked questions. We hope you find it helpful.

 

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Web Link: Hospital discharge planning-what to expect

Patients should be fully involved in planning for going home and should be kept informed of any changes. Each hospital has its own policy and arrangements for discharging patients. Nevertheless, there are often standards of care and information that must be met for patients and their family members. Going gome from hospital can, and often does, involve a number of different health and social care professionals, and it’s a good idea to know who is involved in arranging your...

Article: How can I find out more about what happened in Intensive Care?

How can I find out more about what happened in Intensive Care? It can depend on the type and level of information you’re looking for. Some people are more comfortable with a basic understanding, whereas others prefer to have a more detailed medical explanation. It’s completely up to you. You may find that the type of information you would like changes as you recover. Here are some things you can do that might help. Ask your family and friends They will be able...

Web Link: How to find different community services across Lothian

Community services across Lothian are delivered by four different Community Health Parterships (CHP's). The CHP's are East Lothian, Midlothian, West Lothian and Edinburgh City. These partnerships between health and social care aim to provide comprehensive services in the community based on individual need. The services offered will depend on which region within Lothian that you live in but will include things like physiotherapy, pharmacy, dietetics, mental health services,...

Article: ICU follow up services

What is Intensive Care follow up? Follow up basically involves Intensive Care staff seeing patients after they've been transferred to the general wards or at an out-patient clinic after they've gone home.Follow up is also sometimes known as "outreach". Do all Intensive Care Units follow up their patients? No. Some Intensive Care Units have staff who see patients after Intensive Care and some don't. Who is involved in follow up? Some services...

External Video: ICU support after transfer to the wards

In this video, Trish talks about her role as an ICU Liaison Nurse at Ninewlls Hospital in Dundee.

Web Link: Intermediate Care in Lothian

This link will take you to the website of HousingCare.org and their page on Intermediate Care in Edinburgh. What is Intermediate Care? Intermediate or after hospital care services are those provided to elderly people at home (or in a residential setting) for a short period of time. They help people with complex care needs to recuperate, recover or convalesce after an illness or hospital admission and to maximise their independence. The service aims to prevent unnecessary...

Article: Joint stiffness and pain

Patients sometimes suffer from stiff and painful joints after Intensive Care, particularly in the ankles, knees, elbows and shoulders.This can make it difficult to do simple things like getting out of bed, walking around the ward or washing and showering. Why do I have joint stiffness or pain? Patients who have spent longer in Intensive Care seem to be at greater risk of developing joint stiffness and pain. Joint stiffness and pain can be due to several things but is most...

External Video: Louise describes her critical illness and the process of getting better

In this video clip, Louise a former Intensive Care patient talks about her experiences of critical illness five years on and the process of getting better and getting on with her life. You can read interviews,listen to voice recordings and watch clips of other patients' experiences of Intensive Care by using the link to a free website called Healthtalkonline: http://healthtalkonline.org/search/all/intensive%20care